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Armagh and the royal centres in early medieval Ireland monuments, cosmology and the past by Nicholas Boyter Aitchison

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Published by Boydell and Brewer for Cruithne Press in Woodbridge, Suffolk .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Armagh (Ireland and Northern Ireland) -- History.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementN.B. Aitchison.
The Physical Object
Paginationx,356 p. :
Number of Pages356
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22370049M
ISBN 101873448023

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The Book of Armagh; edited with introduction and appendices by John Gwynn, D.D., D.C.L, Royal Irish Academy, Dublin, (NLI) Harkness, David, and Mary O'Dowd, editors, The town in Ireland: papers read before the Irish Conference of Historians, Belfast, 30 May-2 June , by Irish Conference of Historians ( Belfast, Northern Ireland. The Book of Armagh (Trinity College Dublin MS 52) is one of the most significant manuscripts to survive from early medieval Ireland. A small volume (c. mm x mm), it contains texts relating to St Patrick, a complete New Testament (the only Irish copy to survive from the period) and documents concerning St Martin of Tours. The whole layout of the medieval city of Armagh seems to have been laid out as a five-fold cosmological model, further asserting the right to be the spiritual centre of the country. The evidence for this is difficult to summarise but has been approached in Aitchison's book-length work, Armagh and the Royal Centres in Early Medieval Ireland. The Book of Armagh was enshrined in the year by Donnchadh, son of Flan, king of Ireland, though the shrine has not survived. In , king Brían Bóramha visited Armagh, left twenty ounces of gold on the altar of the church, and caused an entry to be made in the Book of Armagh which acknowledged Armagh's supreme position in the affections.

Aitchison, N. B. () Armagh and the royal centres in early medieval Ireland: monuments, cosmology and the idge: Boydell and Brewer for Cruithne Press [Glasgow]. ‘Clonmacnoise: art and patronage in the early medieval period’. –60 in Cormac Bourke (ed), From the Isles of the North: Early Medieval art in Ireland and . The version that survived in Ireland was contained within a manuscript called The Book of Armagh (Dublin, Trinity College, Ms), which contains most important later traditions about Patrick and dates from the second half of the seventh century. It was one of the five early provinces of Ireland, and by A.D. it comprised much of the territory of the Southern Ui Neill with its capital at the royal site of Tara, Ireland's first captial. In Henry II bestowed Meath as an earldom to Hugh de Lacy, creating an English territorial nobility that lasted into the 17th century.

Armagh and the Royal Centres in Early Medieval Ireland: Monuments, Cosmology, and the past. By N. B. Aitchison. Pp x, Woodbridge & Rochester: Boydell & Brewer, for the Cruithne Press, Glasgow. £ - Volume 30 Issue - Charles DohertyAuthor: Charles Doherty. Armagh and the Royal Centres in Early Medieval Ireland: Monuments, Cosmology Nicholas Boyter Aitchison Snippet view - /5(1). Download Book An Archaeological Survey Of County Armagh in PDF format. You can Read Online An Archaeological Survey Of County Armagh here in PDF, EPUB, Mobi or Docx formats Armagh and the Royal Centres in Early Medieval Ireland. Monuments, Cosmology, and the Past. Author. The Royal School Armagh aims to provide its pupils with an education which in its wholeness will enable them to achieve their full potential in academic, social, moral and spiritual terms. The values of the School, both implicitly and explicitly, reflect and are informed by the reformed tradition of the Christian faith.